#2 Finland's Public Education System, Helsinki, Finland. 1972 - 1984

Photo credit: Connie Giffin

Photo credit: Connie Giffin

Finland’s holistic model encourages year round outdoor activity; bicycles being the favored mode of student transportation. Each student is nurtured and supported to realize their highest individual potential thus creating a society and economic base that serves all of its members. Both public and private schools offer the same educational program and equal opportunity. The parent’s level of belief and trust in their government’s capacity to provide the best possible education for their children and society is unsurpassed.  Agreeing to Pearson Education’s standardized testing of their students for the purpose of ranking educational success in the industrialized nations, in 2012 Finland’s students shared the top honors with South Korea’s industrial model education and continue to rank among the world’s top educational systems. 

Headquartered in Helsinki, Finland, the nation-state transition of the public education system through university or technical college level was created and implemented between 1972 and 1984. Having limited raw materials to produce products, this country choose to invest in its greatest resource: its people. Its purpose was to create an equitable education for all its learners to further serve the country’s vision in the best interests of all its citizens. Teaching is supported, autonomous, and highly respected. Government funded, it charges no tuition and provides support such as meals and transportation when needed.

Photo credit: Connie Giffin

Photo credit: Connie Giffin

 

 

Photo credit: Connie Giffin

Photo credit: Connie Giffin

Finland’s greatest achievement may be in demonstrating that a nation-state holds the capacity to change and even discard its outmoded industrial era education system at the public level and create a system that is appropriate to serve the current needs of its population. The system is periodically evaluated and revised to better fulfill the current and future needs of the society it serves. In August, 2016, The Finnish National Board of Education will introduce a new core curriculum for basic education.  It emphasizes the joy of learning and the pupils’ active role. It is based on the learning concept that positive emotional experiences, collaborative working and interaction, and creative activity enhance learning. It further emphasizes the importance of learning environments and methods, guidance and individualization, and assessment. To learn more visit: http://www.oph.fi/english